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Time is valuable and precious. More valuable than money. Money you can grow. My brother's occupation is in the stock market, and he recently said, "I need more money to make money." You can grow money. Time you can not. Time has no interest. There are no do-overs with time. You only get one August 6th, 2014. That day will come and then be gone forever. 

I was recently listening to a podcast from a message delivered by Bryan Loritts on just this subject. Bryan is a tremendous leader and pastor at Fellowship in Memphis, Tenn. His insight into this topic is both poignant and timely. 

There are two extremes when it comes to our work. Both Bad. 

1. Under-Working (Post For Another Day)

2. Over-Working

For those that, like me, tend to overwork, we do this because we can't and don't say "no." We are people pleasers. We want people to like us. Another reason may be that we have a success idol. On your death bed, do you believe you will regret not working enough? Or will you regret as you look back on your life, from working too much? 

In Crazy Busy, Kevin DeYoung gives a little assessment in calculating what he calls Hurry Sickness. 

1. Do you check work emails and phone messages at home?

2. Has anyone told you, "I did not want to trouble you because I knew how busy you are"

3. Does your family and friends ever complain about not getting time with you?

4. If tomorrow evening was suddenly freed up, would you do work or a household chore?

5. Do you often feel tired during the day and/or do you find your neck and shoulders aching?

6. Do you often exceed the speed limit while driving?

7. Do you pray with your children regularly?

8. Do you have enough time to pray?

9. Do you have a hobby that you are actively involved in? 

10. Do you eat together as a family or household at least once a day?

How did you do? Would you consider yourself a person suffering from Hurry Sickness? 

We were not made to be hurried. 

We Were Made To Be BUSY
“The reason we are busy is because we are supposed to be busy. If you have creativity, ambition, and love, you will be busy. We are supposed to disciple the nations. We are supposed to work with our hands. We are supposed to love God with our minds. It’s not a sin to be busy. It’s not wrong to be active.”
— Kevin DeYoung
Busy is not a bad thing. It is not a four letter word. Kevin DeYoung goes on to say:
“The busyness that’s bad is not the busyness of work, but the busyness that works hard at the wrong things. It's busy trying to please people, busy trying to control others, busy trying to do things we haven’t been called to do. So please don’t hear from me that work is bad, or that bearing burden is bad. ”
Overworked is bad. Busy is not. 

The Antidote* 

Intentionally establish rhythms of rest.

Schedule times of rest in your calendar.

Unplug the phone or tech when you get home.

Read my post on napping. 

Spend time with people that bring you life-giving relationships. 

Do life according to your priorities not based on tasks. (opportunities are not obligations) 

*from Bryan Loritts 

The reason we are busy is because we are supposed to be busy. If you have creativity, ambition, and love, you will be busy. We are supposed to disciple the nations. We are supposed to work with our hands. We are supposed to love God with our minds. It’s not a sin to be busy. It’s not wrong to be active.
— Kevin DeYoung

Busy is not a bad thing. It is not a four letter word. Kevin DeYoung goes on to say:

The busyness that’s bad is not the busyness of work, but the busyness that works hard at the wrong things. It’s being busy trying to please people, busy trying to control others, busy trying to do things we haven’t been called to do. So please don’t hear from me that work is bad or that bearing burdens is bad.

Overworked is bad. Busy is not. 

The Antidote* 

Intentionally establish rhythms of rest.

Schedule times of rest in your calendar.

Unplug the phone or tech when you get home.

Read my post on napping. 

Spend time with people that bring you life-giving relationships. 

Do life according to your priorities not based on tasks. (opportunities are not obligations) 

*from Bryan Loritts